Friday, July 28, 2017

"Serape Sunrise"

Rock "CYFI" Martinez and Fernando Leon have recently completed a mural on the north wall of the Desert Suds Car Wash.  It includes Our Lady of Guadalupe, a UFO and a 1964 Chevrolet Impala convertible.

The south wall of the car wash has a Luis Mena mural.  See Classic Car 
Click on the above photo for a larger and sharper image.

Friday, July 21, 2017

Maybe Murals, part 77

Another Dunbar/Springs Roundabout.  This one is at the intersection of W. University Blvd. and N. 11th Ave. The artists are Zach Lihatsh and Troy Neiman.  The north and south sides of the column are devoted to the history of the neighborhood.  The east and west sides depict some of the people who made that history.
North Side
South Side
East Side
West Side
All of the photos had to be taken at an angle.  The black and yellow traffic warnings block a direct view.

I encourage you to click on any photo for a slide show of larger and sharper images.

Monday, July 17, 2017

Maybe Murals, part 76

Roundabout at N. 9th Ave. & W. 5th St.

Mary Lucking was commissioned by the Tucson/Pima Arts Council in 2003 to create artwork for three Roundabouts in the Dunbar/Springs Neighborhood.  This is the third of the three.

Mary has used her art to tell the story of the neighborhood.  Mary also filled the center with desert plants.   Here are the results:
North Side
South Side
East Side
West Side
Note - The photo of the west side had to be taken at an angle due to lens flare from the morning sun.

Some of the panels are starting to show the effects of age and weathering.  It also looks like there was some vandalism that had to be painted over.

Click on any photo for a slide show of larger and sharper images.

Friday, July 14, 2017

Maybe Murals, part 75

Dunbar/Spring Roundabout at N. 9th Ave. & W. 1st St.

Mary Lucking was commissioned by the Tucson/Pima Arts Council in 2003 to create artwork for three Roundabouts in the Dunbar/Springs Neighborhood.  This is the second of the three.

Mary has used her art to tell the story of the neighborhood.  Mary also filled the center with desert plants.   Here are the results:
North Side
South Side
West Side
East Side.
Note - The bottom panel of the East Side photo is probably a reference to the old Court St. Cemetery.  See Neighborhood atop cemetery

Some of the panels are starting to show the effects of age and weathering.

Click on any photo for a slideshow of larger and sharper images.

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Joe's signature is back

Joe had prepared for his mural (the huge one on the south side of Epic Rides, next to Stone just north of 6th Street), to be trashed. That's why he'd sprayed a protective clear coat over the finished project. The coat can make it easier to remove paint on top of his. It can also help protect the mural from sun and weather damage.

On July 2, or maybe a few days before — just after he'd lovingly finished the mural — someone crossed out his signature. I don't know much about the stories behind the art that hateful groups paint, but I sure wish they'd stop making Tucson uglier and breaking the hearts of artists and art lovers for their own selfish wants.

When I checked back a couple days ago, the signature had been restored.

Monday, July 10, 2017

Maybe Murals, part 74

Roundabout at N. 11th Ave. & W. 1st St.  What is a Roundabout you might ask.  It's a circle of concrete curbing placed in the middle of an intersection.  If you work for Tucson's Dept. of Transportation it's a Traffic Circle.  To the rest of us it's a Roundabout and a pain in the posterior.

Mary Lucking was commissioned by the Tucson/Pima Arts Council in 2003 to create artwork for three Roundabouts in the Dunbar/Springs Neighborhood.  I suspect the motive was to give drivers something to look at while they figured out how to make a left turn.

Mary has used her art to tell the story of the neighborhood.  This is her story of the old Court Street Cemetery.  The cemetery closed in 1908 but only about half the bodies were moved. The remaining 4,000+ still lie beneath the streets and homes of the Dunbar/Spring Neighborhood.  May they rest in peace.
Hallowed Ground
East Side
North Side
West Side
South Side
Some of the panels are starting to show the effects of old age and weathering.

Click on any photo for a slide show of larger and sharper images.

Here's an article you might like: Neighborhood atop cemetery

Wednesday, July 05, 2017

CyFi & Pagac paint underwater Bowie mural

Browsing Facebook on June 20th, I came across an incredible video by Seattle-based Ten Hundred Art. It shows Tucson muralist Joe Pagac and born-and-raised (former) Tucson muralist Rock "CyFi" Martinez painting a mural of David Bowie at the bottom of a swimming pool. As the video ends, the pool fills with water and the mural shows through. Amazing!

I'll try to get permission from Ten Hundred to link the video here. In case I can't contact them, though, you can find the video on their website. As of this writing, it's the fifth video on this web page:

www.tenhundredart.com/videos/

On that page, the text under the video says:

Ten Hundred - Bowie Pool Mural

Making of the David Bowie swimming pool mural.

Monday, July 03, 2017

Closeups of Epic Rides mural

Here are some close-up photos I grabbed of Joe Pagac's mural on the south wall of Epic Rides. I took most of them on June 18th and the last on June 23rd. (You can see the mural being painted, from March through June, in our three pages starting with Murals being made, part 46a: Tucson's biggest.)

To help you get oriented, here's the whole mural on June 21st. This photo is a fair amount bigger than most of the ones in this blog entry, so it's especially worthwhile clicking on it for more detail:

Bring on the close-ups!

Sunday, July 02, 2017

!*?%&#= TAGGERS!!

I've never belonged to a gang, had "rivals," fought for "my part" of town, or had no qualms about destroying property. A lot of graffiti taggers consider themselves artists. It used to be that taggers would leave more-traditional artists alone; ruining real art — especially crossing out someone's signature — was basically unheard of (in Tucson, at least)… it was an insult to your brother or sister artist.

Half an hour ago, I pulled into the parking lot near Epic Rides' new mural by Joe Pagac. Needless to say, I was horrified. This majestic mural took three months to finish.

If for some reason you haven't seen the mural, we've posted three long blog entries here showing the mural taking shape. The most recent one was Murals being made, part 46c: Tucson's biggest.



Here's an "editorial." I avoid politics or (most) strong opinions on this blog, but I'm just so angry…

[There are suggestions farther down.]

I aim to be impartial (especially on our Tucson Art pages!), and I won't participate in feuds between artists. But I decided to make an exception here becase this trashing of a beautiful mural (just a corner, but the corner with Joe's signature!) was despicable. What if the panel with donors' names at the bottom right coner were trashed? I've heard that taggers' styles are often well-known in an area, maybe gang-turf related, and officials know whodunnit… I think the problem may be finding (and punishing) them.

I thought former Sheriff Arpaio's outdoor tent city, keeping inmates in Phoenix heat wearing pink underwear, was cruel and unusual. But I'm getting the idea. "Artists" of this style deserve that punishment and more. Restoring murals and being forced to buy the paint, while wearing loose painting clothes (pour water on the clothes to keep them cool) with a pink hat and underwear (over the painting clothes?)? Probably that will never stop gangs tagging art and other property, so here's another idea.

Luckily, the mural is too tall to trash completely. And I saw a photo of Joe clearcoating the mural to protect it. I've heard (maybe from him?) that the tags on a clearcoated mural can be powerwashed off. If so, how about crowdfunding an effort for a company like Graffiti Protective Coatings to protect new murals? Michael Schwartz is trying the same thing for Tucson Arts Brigade murals (though I think it's only for TAB murals). Citizens and businesses who own powerwashers might loan them to artists.